Monday, May 25, 2020

Mrs. Mallards Character in The Story of an Hour by Kate...

Socrates, a Greek philosopher once said: Each one must know himself. Unfortunately, most of us are not aware of our true character. Social conventions are the main cause making us repress what we really think and feel. Only when unexpected events happen, we do have an opportunity to take a close look at our hidden self.The Story of An Hour by Kate Chopin reflects the dramatic development process of Mrs.Mallards character through the death of her husband; it demonstrates that the true identity cannot be sheltered forever. At the beginning of the story, the author describes Mrs.Mallard as a woman having the distinctive trait of self-assertion which is constrained by her marriage. She seems to be the victim of an†¦show more content†¦Although she had loved him--sometimes, she unconsciously does not want to accept blindly the situation of being controlled by her husband. Mrs.Mallard is not a one-dimentional, clone-like woman having an expected, acceptable emotional response for every life condition. Mrs.Mallards rather uncommon reaction to the news of Mr.Brently Mallards death logically foreshadows the complete revelation of her suppressed longing for freedom. Being alone in her room When the storm of grief is over, she experiences something coming to her and she was waiting for it, fearfully. What was it? She did not know; it was too subtle and elusive to name. Finally, she recognizes the freedom she has desired for a long time and it overcomes her sorrow: Free! Body and soul free! She kept whispering. In her soul, the dark clouds are disappearing because she is illuminated. All the memories of her husband are now of the past. She is living in the present. At this point, she is no longer Mrs.Mallard. She is Louise and is ready to welcome a new horizon of freedom : Spring days, and summer days, and all sorts of days that would be her own. Overwhelmed with a new sense of herself, she feels as if she was a goddess of Victory. In just a brief hour, she learns what it is like to be her own person, to live for herself without the force of her husbands will.Show MoreRelated The Story of an Hour and The Hand Essay1161 Words   |  5 PagesThe â€Å"Story of an Hour† by Kate Chopin and ‘†The Hand† by Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette are similar in theme and setting. Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette and Kate Chopin create the theme of obligatory love and the unhappiness it entails. Both stories illustrate the concealed emotions many women feel in their marriage yet fail to express them. The two stories take place in a sacred room of the house and both transpire in a brief amount of time. The differences between the two stories are seen through theRead MoreThe Story Of An Hour By Kate Chopin862 Words   |  4 PagesFiction Analysis: The Story of an Hour Kate Chopin’s short story, â€Å"The Story of an Hour†, is about one married woman’s true hidden feelings of being married in the 19th century. The story was published in 1894, a time where it was unacceptable for women to express their wants and needs as a woman. Women were not seen equal to men and did not have the same privileges as men such as voting. Therefore, some of her literary works were considered controversial. It wasn’t soon until the late 20 centuryRead More Irony in Kate Chopins Story of an Hour Essay796 Words   |  4 Pagesin Chopins Story of an Hour    Irony is a useful device for giving stories many unexpected twists and turns. In Kate Chopins The Story of an Hour, irony is used as an effective literary device. Situational irony is used to show the reader that what is expected to happen sometimes doesnt. Dramatic irony is used to clue the reader in on something that is happening that the characters in the story do not know about. Irony is used throughout Chopins The Story of an Hour through theRead More Irony in Kate Chopins The Story of an Hour Essays1295 Words   |  6 PagesIrony in Kate Chopins The Story of an Hour A very dull and boring story can be made into a great story simply by adding in something that is unexpected to happen. When the unexpected is used in literature it is known as irony. An author uses irony to shock the reader by adding a twist to the story. The author of â€Å"The Story of an Hour† is Kate Chopin. Her use of irony in the story is incredibly done more than once. Irony is thinking or believing some event will happen but in return the unexpectedRead More The Differences in Josephine and Mrs. Mallard of Kate Chopins The Story of an Hour760 Words   |  4 PagesThe Differences in Josephine and Mrs. Mallard of Kate Chopins The Story of an Hour Free! Body and soul free!, Mrs. Mallard kept whispering. One persons ultimate freedom may be seen as a tragedy to another. Kate Chopin illustrates this idea in The Story of an Hour. The story is set in the nineteenth century. Chopin uses the death of Mr. Mallard to show the reader Mrs. Mallards deep feelings. In the story, Josephine and Mrs. Mallard are sisters. Although the women come from the sameRead MoreKate Chopin s An Hour1323 Words   |  6 Pagesâ€Å"protection† under an onerous marriage. In The Story of an Hour, through peculiar sentence structure, feministic themes, and irony, Kate Chopin portrays the resentment of women towards the oppressive institution of marriage through Mrs. Mallard’s joviality for her newly discovered freedom- a product of her husband’s assumed passing. Body Paragraph #1- Literary Device: Sentence Structure Kate Chopin commences the short story with â€Å"Knowing that Mrs. Mallard was afflicted with a heart trouble, greatRead MoreThe Story of an Hour† by Kate Chopin Essay1528 Words   |  7 Pagesâ€Å"The Story of an Hour† by Kate Chopin â€Å"The Story of an Hour† by Kate Chopin is very intriguing, not only because of the emotional change Louise Mallard goes through the hour after her husband’s tragic death but also the way Chopin uses irony in the story. During this analysis of â€Å"The Story of an Hour† we will discuss the summary, plot, setting, tone, theme, point of view, emotions of Louise Mallard and other characters involved in the story. Chopin’s story uses the feelings of a married womanRead MoreThe Feminist Movement By Kate Chopin And Boys And Girls By Alice Munro1231 Words   |  5 Pagesrights equal to that of men. Two short stories, â€Å"The Story of an Hour† by Kate Chopin and â€Å"Boys and Girls† by Alice Munro, relate experiences from female perspectives, highlighting oppression against women. The authors use different techniques to show the protagonists’ similar struggle for liberation in their male-dominated environments. While Alice Munro uses the voice of a young girl to establish the limitations women face throughout their entire life, Kate Chopin uses the â€Å"heart disease† of the protagonistRead MoreThe Concept of Epiphany in Kate Chopins Story of an Hour1262 Words   |  5 PagesEpiphany (Rewrite Order #A2101292) An epiphany is the sudden realization or manifestation of understanding, and in the Story of an Hour, by Kate Chopin, a woman experienced an epiphany that ultimately had tragic results. The tragedy was foreshadowed in the first line when the narrator informed the reader of Mrs. Mallards heart trouble and the problems it could bring when informing her of her husbands death. But instead of being the cause of tremendous sorrow, the death of her husband broughtRead MoreStory Of An Hour Critical Analysis770 Words   |  4 PagesKate Chopin’s short story, â€Å"The Story of an Hour (1894),† portrays that the confinements placed on women due to gender roles was unjust. Chopin illustrates this through the progression of Mrs. Mallards emotions and thoughts after learning of her husbands supposed death, as well as alluding to their form of marriage. Chopins purpose is to point out how unjust woman were treated in society in order to bring about change on such treatment. Given t he time period, Chopin dedicated her short story to

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Gaius Julius Augustus Germanicus Caesar - Free Essay Example

Sample details Pages: 3 Words: 849 Downloads: 1 Date added: 2019/03/26 Category History Essay Level High school Topics: Julius Caesar Essay Did you like this example? Gaius Julius Augustus Germanicus Caesar was born on July 12 or July 13, 100 BCE, to the Praetor Gaius Julius Caesar, who controlled parts of Asia. His mother was a woman named Aurelia Cotta. When Julius became 16 years old, his father died. Don’t waste time! Our writers will create an original "Gaius Julius Augustus Germanicus Caesar" essay for you Create order Being the oldest man alive in the family, Julius became head of the Caesar family. Soon after, Gaius became the high priest of Jupiter (Zeus), the god of lightning, thunder, and the gods. After becoming the High Priest of Jupiter, he became engaged to a patrician girl named Cornelia Cinna. The empire of Rome soon became under the rule of Sulla and purged Rome of people who believed in the Populare Ideology, and of his political enemies, like Cornelias father. Sulla attempted to force Caesar to divorce Cornelia, who was the daughter of one of Sullas rivals. According to Ancient History.eu, The Populare ideology was about favoring a democratic government and giving more rights to the lower class citizens. Caesar then fled Rome in a hope to escape Sulla, but he was stripped of his role of high priest, and Cornelias dowry was stolen. Without money, Caesar joined the Roman Army. During the time in the army, Gaius was given many awards, such as the civic crown, and was promoted to the ranks of military legate of Bithynia to gain control of a fleet of ships. Caesar then moved back to Rome for a new life after Sulla died. In 75 BCE, Caesar was captured by a group of pirates and was to be ransomed for 20 marks. Julius argued he should be ransomed for 50 marks, because of his talents on the battlefield. During his time during the ransom, he maintained a good relationship with the pirates. It is said that Caesar threatened the pirates multiple times to let him go or else when he was let free, he would hunt them down and crucify them. The pirates took this as a joke, however, and didnt believe him. After Caesar was let free, he hunted them down and slit the pirates throat before their crucifixion. When he got back to Rome, he was honored as a military tribune when in Rome. He became a lawyer and was extremely successful. He then went to Rhodes to study philosophy. Cornelia soon died of giving birth to a stillborn child, and Caesar married the granddaughter of Sulla, Pompeia. According to biography.com, Caesar then created a private army and fought Mithridates VI (6) Eupator who declared war on Rome. Caesar was successful in his battle with Mithridates, and worked with Pompey, and went up in political status. They would soon divorce. With his close friends Pompey and Crassus in 60 BC, forming the first trimutive. The trimutive lasted 7 years. It would have lasted longer if Crassus was not killed in battle. Pompey soon saw Caesar as an enemy, because of his growing power. They fought, and the battle went to Egypt. Pompey was killed in Egypt by the hand of Caesar. Cleopatra and Caesar soon had an alliance and had a child. The childs name was Caesarion. Cleopatra wanted Caesar to take Caesarion to Rome, and make him his heir. However, Caesars heir was already Octavian. He kept his promise to take Caesarion to Rome. When Caesar arrived back to Rome, he was named emperor. Julius Caesar was a leader who favored his citizens. He got rid of taxes, initiated the police force, let former enemies go in the Caesar and more. There was a conspiracy of Caesar, and a group of senators, fearing their power, started to play an assassination on Caesar, expecting to be treated as heroes when the emperor fell to the ground, dead. They had a plan to kill Julius Caesar on March 15, 44 BC. He was given a warning of Beware the Ides of March. He chose to ignore it, as he did not understand. On the day of a Senate meeting, which was held on the Ides of March, he was talking to the senators, when a group of them stood up, with weapons in their hands, they went up, and stabbed Caesar 23 times. His last words were the phrase which translates to English as You too, Child? In William Shakespeares play, Julius Caesar, the last words of Caesar were Et tu, Brute? which means Even you, Brutus?. He died at the age of 55 8/12 ye ars old. The conspirators went out and said People of Rome, you are free. and were met by angry citizens. instead treated instead of heroes, but as criminals, for Rome loved Caesar. Especially the commoners, who enjoyed how Caesar treated them. His death was the end of the Roman Republic, and the start of the bloody Roman Empire. I believe that Caesar was a great man, who ruled justly and loved the people in Rome. It was nice to hear that Caesar made life easier for the Romans, and made it so the Roman Republic was at peace before he was assassinated. He didnt deserve his death, and if he were to live on, he would have reformed the Roman Republic, and make Rome better than ever.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Analysis Of Sax s Film Othello - 1457 Words

Surname 2 Student’s Name Instructor’s Name Course Date Analysis of Sax’s Film in Relation to the Text Geoffrey Sax s advanced retelling of William Shakespeare s Othello can control Shakespeare s unique ideas in spite of the time period and connection in which both writings happen, while investigating the all inclusive topics of prejudice, misogyny and force. Shakespeare s play reflects conventional Elizabethan connections and qualities in its investigation of such ideas amidst a catastrophe impelled on by misleading and desirously (Aebischer 12). On the other hand, Geoffrey Sax s 2001 representation of Othello, set in 1980s London, concentrates on issues of prejudice and ladies in a post-women s activist society. In spite of the diverse the distinctive time periods both writings have the same all inclusive thoughts. The Elizabethan times an apprehension of non-native took into consideration bigot perspectives to create. This is obvious in the way the shade of Othello s skin is an image of his distance and one of his most prominent insecurities that in the long run prompts his ruin. All through the play Iago utilizes preposterous creature symbolism to depict Othello as an animalistic outcast. In the first scene Iago and Roderigo are indicated utilizing deriding comments, calling him a Barbary steed and thick lips, further solidifying his place as an outcast. Through resulting differentiating symbolism the representation, an old dark ram is tupping your whiteShow MoreRelatedDifferences Between Film And Othello1503 Words   |  7 PagesThroughout the years the play Othello by William Shakespeare has been adapted both on the screen and on stage many times. The questions or race and racism that have quite often been a point of discussion with William Shakespeare’s play Othello can be seen thr ough the bard, however some may argue that Othello’s skin colour was purely a plot device. This paper will look at two film that have been re-made since the 1960’s, which provides an analysis of the concept of race and how political ideas and

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Diamond in the Rough free essay sample

He owns his own music company and built his empire around No Limit (the hottest in the business). He was almost a NAB player, and he owns his own line of dolls (the Master P doll). His company makes a net worth each year of $361 million. His record company sold 26 million records in 1998, more then any other rap company. He also has made a lot f money in staring and directing in movies that profit at least $10 million each. He also has his own clothing line that makes a net worth of $10 million in 1999. Master P has built his own record company, which many rappers have tried to copy, but he is different with all of them because he does not have a Joint contract with any record labeler. In fact the head of No Limits various enterprises-each division is actually a separate privately held company-has succeeded with a surprisingly sound sisal strategy and has attracted a cadre of enterprising young executives to help him manage the companys meteoric growth. We will write a custom essay sample on Diamond in the Rough or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page Master P has been one of the youngest people to hit on the worlds youngest Rich that has been published In fortune magazine. He has learned and mastered the market as we no It and there will never be anyone else like him, and thats why he Is a diamond in the rough, and will always be set apart In the elite few of the hard-core rappers and In the world of the young and rich.

Tuesday, April 7, 2020

Globalisation and cultural homogeneity

Introduction Globalisation is the aspect of integrating political, economic and social systems across the world. Globalisation has its pros and cons. However, the view regarding its role differs depending on the side of the divide one belongs. Proponents argue that globalisation has led to opening up of more opportunities for the peoples of the world while critics perceive globalisation as a tool for perpetuating inequality.Advertising We will write a custom essay sample on Globalisation and cultural homogeneity specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More Critics further argue that globalisation is an act of westernization or Americanization of the globe. Whether, one sees globalisation as a tool for exploiting the developing world or not, it is noticeable that it has played a leading role towards cultural homogeneity. Culture is so dynamic (Van Krieken, 2010). Despite the high level of dynamism, each culture has a personality. As such, diff erent cultures although similar in certain ways do exhibit certain deviations. This forms the idea upon which cultural diversity is grounded. One important aspect that pins culture is based on how it is learned. Culture is not transferred genetically. Instead, culture is handed down from one generation to the next. Although it is alleged that language plays a crucial role in the transmission of culture, several other factors such as economics, politics, ethnicity, etc also contribute significantly. It is worth mentioning that culture is an ongoing process that gives communities a sense of dignity, identity, continuity and security. Such aspects are important in binding societies together. Ethnic and cultural demographics The number of ethnicities across the globe is not clearly determined. However, it is evident that ethnicities are too many even when viewed within individual countries. However, different demographic aspects are available. As an example, major world religions and la nguages are easily identifiable. Based on the United Nations, (2010), in 2009, the world population was split across these religions Christian 33.45% (Anglican 1.27%, Orthodox 4.04%, Protestant 6.07%, Roman Catholic 16.84%), Muslim 22.44%, Hindu 13.77%, Buddhist 7.12%, Sikh 0.36%, Jewish 0.22%, Baha’i 0.12%, other religions 11.20%, non-religious 9.43%, atheists 2.03%. On the other hand, languages spoken include Japanese 1.8%, Russian 2.12 Portuguese 2.62%, %, Javanese 1.25%, Standard German 1.33%, Bengali 2.66%, Hindi 2.68%, Arabic 3.25%, English 4.83%, Spanish 4.85%, Mandarin Chinese 12.44 % (the languages relate to native speakers statistics). It should be noted that globalisation has contributed to the alteration of these statistics. It should not surprise people that most English speakers are not native speakers. In addition, China has opened several centres in the developing world aimed at spreading its culture and language to these parts of the world.Advertising Lo oking for essay on cultural studies? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Effect of globalisation on culture With the emergence of the phenomenon of globalisation, cultures have changed significantly (Kull, 2001). By way of illustration, culture has had immense effects on behaviour in different ways among various societies. Globalisation has influenced the living ways as people ape others from different parts. The most significant effect of globalisation rests on the notion that it has hugely affected the economic institutions of all countries in the world. For keen observers, it is easy to draw the connection between the economic institution and the other institutions such as the polity and the social institution. It is perhaps critical to mention that with globalisation, the concept of free trade has gained unmatched preference across the globe. The effects of the opening up of the economies or trade liberalisation have definitely inf luenced the culture of people in unimaginable proportions. The demands of globalisation are wide-ranging. As the phenomenon of globalisation takes centre stage, countries find themselves in unknown territories (Van Krieken, 2010). As such, each country seeks measures that are helpful in remaining relevant globally. This demands that each State adopts certain approaches that help enhance its competitiveness. At other levels, countries such as the developing ones have been forced to take certain steps geared towards the promotion of global trade and development. As an illustration, the developing nations were required to adopt the Structural Adjustment Programmes (SAPs) in order to attain economic growth and development. By developing these programmes, the developing world was in effect replicating the development culture of the developed world. Thus, this presents movement of the world towards a common developmental culture. In this regard, the governments of the developing countries were encouraged to cede ground in service provision. This would allow the private sector more room to control the economy. In the process, it was expected that the developing countries would move towards the elimination of undesirable inefficiencies associated with government involvement in business. Due to globalisation, economic problems have increased (Hartungi, 2001). This has forced a sizeable percentage of women to look for employment opportunities outside their homes. Apparently, this development is a direct response to the declining earnings that men are entitled. As such, women are pursuing alternatives to supplement what their spouses earn. This has an adverse effect on family life. Family life is no longer the way it used to be. This view holds since, women were initially relegated to household duties as men sought paid employment. However, with increasing globalisation, both sexes have been forced into actively looking for paid jobs. The family unit has experienced a nu mber of adverse effects based on the fact that women are also seeking employment.Advertising We will write a custom essay sample on Globalisation and cultural homogeneity specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More As an illustration, the incidence of family instability has soared. In addition, the role of caregivers within society has gained dominance. This new culture is almost present in every society as women move out of homes to find jobs. An aspect of homogeneity is visible in regards to the idea that women are entering the job market across the globe. Proponents of globalisation thought it would help reduce the aspect of inequality (Kull, 2001). Based on the theory of globalisation, all participants, women or men, poor or rich would be affected in equal measure. The theory also presumed that windows of opportunity would open equally both to the small-scale and the big-scale entrepreneurs. It does require a genius to point out that pl ayers are unequal at the global level. As such, opening up trade and allowing all players the same opportunities amounts to unfairness to the small players. In a nutshell, global opening up of trade facilitates the collapse of livelihoods in the poor regions. As an illustration, the transnational players such as multinational corporations have huge resources unlike the local based industries which are unable to offer anything of note. Concisely, it is unfair to allow two unequal players the same field to operate. The effect of allowing unequal players has led to the collapse of poor industries as multinational corporations take control. Tools of globalisation are different. However, the internet plays a key role in the integration process (Kull, 2001). The internet has profoundly affected how people relate. It is no longer necessary to have a face to face engagement. Rather, people are able to communicate more freely. The internet is also useful in aiding the dissemination of inform ation. Since the advent of the internet, the society has changed in unprecedented ways. As an illustration, it has interfered with the cultural demands of meeting physically. This implies that the internet has contributed towards an increase in the distance between members of a family or a community. Further, people are encouraged to work outside since they are able to communicate from any corner of the world. Consequently, this has contributed towards the tampering of the social fabric of society. Globalisation plays a role in the creation of class cleavages within societies. As Kull, (2001) observes, globalisation creates classes of the rich and the poor. This is achieved through opening up of economies. In poor States those people who loose on economic grounds find reasons to form ethnic alliances.Advertising Looking for essay on cultural studies? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More This is based on the notion that forming united approaches within States is an important step towards securing resources through gaining political power. It is thus not surprising that the emergence of splinter and rebellious groups within societies has coincided with the expansion of globalisation within the society. Kull, (2001) further holds the view that globalisation has played a leading role in devaluing the concept of citizenship. As Kull, (2001) reckons, citizenship is a prerequisite that plays a facilitating role to a proper functioning society. This view holds great relevance in democratic nations. However, globalisation hinders the growth of democracy. As globalisation spreads its tentacles, members of societies become mobile. Additionally, as competition heightens, individuals are forced to move to different places to secure employment. Such mobility implies that people cannot occupy distinct political spaces. Hence, these individuals are transformed to world citizens. T his group of individuals rarely bothers to find out what goes on at their countries of origin. This clearly illustrates that globalisation alters cultural practices of people towards a commonality. With globalisation, individuals become more independent in terms of economic wellness. Based on this, individuals no longer depend on their extended families since they become socially independent. This leads to primary isolation of individuals from their families. Social isolation may lead to the emergence of disorders. Isolation is even worse when viewed in regards to the older generation. This group suffers since their incomes are reduced and solely relies on the younger generation. The aspect of cultural bereavement is closely connected with globalisation (Ardalan, 2008). Globalisation undermines the social fabric of different societies. This results from the intrusion of the Western cultures which are seen as superior. When people migrate to look for greener pastures, they are forced to adopt new ways of life. This basically underscores the attributes of uprooted individuals who struggle to fit into new environments and alien obligations. Globalisation has contributed towards the democratization process (Dalpino, 2001). As an illustration, a host of nations across the world have incorporated the human rights doctrine into their constitutions. Apart from incorporating the human rights doctrine, States are required to observe the provisions of the doctrine. In addition, the development of international organisations such the International Criminal Court indicates that the world is moving towards a culture of accountability. Tensions attributable to globalisation Globalisation has led to the emergence of three main tensions. The first tension is based on the impasse between individual and societal choices (Harrison, 2007). As an illustration, this tension emerges when an individual is restricted in terms of the choices s/he can make. At times individuals find it d ifficult to exercise their rights regarding lifestyles or thoughts as they are likely to encounter conflicting demands put forth by the society. As an illustration, an individual interested to purchase a certain product may be put off due to the perception a society holds regarding the product in question. More specifically, globalisation has pushed society o adopt certain behavioural issues which individuals may not like but may have to follow in order to suit in the society. As an example, individuals are expected to fasten safety belts although they may be unwilling to use the belts. Another example of the spread of American culture is reflected in preference of entertainment programs. The American and European dominance is of particular concern. This has led some countries such as France to regulate both radio and television content. However, in most cases, the predominant western cultural entertainment has taken over world airwaves. The second tension rests on the notion that t here is a contention regarding free market enterprise and government intervention (Harrison and McMillan, 2007). This tension draws upon the previous one since free market enterprise is based on individual freedom of choice while market regulation presents an attempt to limit or restrict individual choices. Governments are given authority by the society and as a result, what they implement is seen as societal actions. Based on this, free market enterprises allows individuals or entities to freely decide on what to produce and consume while the government interventions limit these provisions. It should be clear that with the emergence of globalisation, State control has been on a steady decline. This reflects itself in the manner in which individuals and private entities are in positions to decide economic operations. Although the government measures continue to decline as the mantra of the private sector continues to expand, it is clear that government interventions have not been co mpletely dealt away with. As an illustration, the inability of the private sector to regulate certain aspects of business has forced governments to step in and provide direction. In addition, the unattractiveness of some services such as social services has forced the governments to also chip in and thus influence resource allocation. In the latter case, the role of governments in checking the problem of global warming presents a good example. Additionally, the actions of private healthcare providers have made health services so expensive thereby forcing governments to intervene. However, poor people across the globe continue to perish as healthcare remains expensive among the poor nations of the world (Schmukler, 2004). The third tension is based on the idea that local authority is in conflict with extra-local authority (Harrison and McMillan, 2007). This rests on the realization that decisions are made at these levels. There is a feeling across the globe that distant organisations are making decisions that have far-reaching effects on their lives and yet they are not offered the opportunity to offer individual views. As an illustration, decisions made by the IMF and the World Bank are often ill-received in the Latin American, Asian and African continents (Weber et al, 2007). Despite the disgruntlement emanating from the role of supranational bodies, it is evident that they hold much power and they are influencing the way people live across different nations. Conclusion Based on the evidence gathered in the essay, it is discernable that the globe is moving towards a convergence. Several aspects such as economic and political systems are moving towards a common end. As an illustration, democracy as a leadership approach is gaining dominance across the world. In addition, globalisation seems to lead to related consequences over the globe. As an illustration, globalisation has contributed towards the spread of a culture of class differentiation within different societies across the world. In conclusion, it is easy to see that globalisation has reduced the gap among world populations. Reference List Ardalan, A. (2008). Globalisation and culture: four paradigmatic views. New York: Poughkeepsie Press. Dalpino, C. (2001). Does globalisation promote democracy? An early assessment.  The Brookings Review 19, 4. Harrison, A. McMillan, M. (2007). On the links between globalisation and poverty. J  Econ Inequal 5, 123-124. Hartungi, R. (2001). Could developing countries take the benefit of globalisation?  International Journal of Social Economics 33, 728-743. Kull, S. (2001). Culture wars? How Americans and Europeans view globalisation.  The Brookings Review 19, 18. Schmukler, S. (2004). Financial Globalisation: Gain and Pain for Developing Countries. Economic Review 89, 39. United Nations (2010). World Statistics Pocketbook 2009. Geneva: United Nations Publications. Van Krieken, S. (2010). Sociology, (Edition4). Sidney: Pearson Education Au stralia. Weber, S. Barma, N. Kroenig, M. Ratner, E. (2007). How Globalisation Went Bad.  Foreign Policy 158, 48. This essay on Globalisation and cultural homogeneity was written and submitted by user Kallie Riggs to help you with your own studies. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly. You can donate your paper here.

Monday, March 9, 2020

Free Essays on Conneticut

Connecticut Connecticut’s original pre-Columbian inhabitants included the western Niantic, Nipmuc, and wappinger Indians. The Connecticut River gave the area its name, a Mohican word meaning â€Å"the long river†. European settlement began in 1633 when Dutch fur merchants from hew Netherlands placed a trading post at modern Hartford. English Puritans founded towns at Windsor and wethersfeild in of that year. In 1637, rev. Thomas Hooker brought his Puritan congregation form Cambridge, Massachusetts, to settle at Hartford, which the Dutch had abandoned. Therefore founding the colony of Connecticut. Tensions with the Pequot escalated following the death of nine English mariners in 1634. these tensions resulted in Massachusetts sending a punitive expedition to punish that tribe in August 1636 two Indian villages were burned. Connecticut militia joined with the Piquot’s Indian enemies in a war that killed probably 40% of the 2,000 Pequot in 1637, compared to only 50 out of the 800 militia. Hartford, Windsor, and wethersfeild agreed on January 24, 1639, to govern themselves by the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut. This frame of government established a legislature and court system . By 1662 fifteen other towns founded in the Connecticut valley had adopted the Fundamental Orders, which were never confirmed by a royal charter. Congregationalism receive legal protection as the colony’s established church. meanwhile Connecticut organized itself to the colony of New Haven in 1643. After the Stuart dynasty resumed the English throne in 1660, Charles II gave Connecticut the right of self-government by a charter dated May 3 1662. the charter also gave the new government jurisdiction over New Haven’s towns. Which were then done away with. Connecticut briefly lost its rights to self-government when it was placed under the authority of the autocratic domain of New England in 1687, but it resumed ... Free Essays on Conneticut Free Essays on Conneticut Connecticut Connecticut’s original pre-Columbian inhabitants included the western Niantic, Nipmuc, and wappinger Indians. The Connecticut River gave the area its name, a Mohican word meaning â€Å"the long river†. European settlement began in 1633 when Dutch fur merchants from hew Netherlands placed a trading post at modern Hartford. English Puritans founded towns at Windsor and wethersfeild in of that year. In 1637, rev. Thomas Hooker brought his Puritan congregation form Cambridge, Massachusetts, to settle at Hartford, which the Dutch had abandoned. Therefore founding the colony of Connecticut. Tensions with the Pequot escalated following the death of nine English mariners in 1634. these tensions resulted in Massachusetts sending a punitive expedition to punish that tribe in August 1636 two Indian villages were burned. Connecticut militia joined with the Piquot’s Indian enemies in a war that killed probably 40% of the 2,000 Pequot in 1637, compared to only 50 out of the 800 militia. Hartford, Windsor, and wethersfeild agreed on January 24, 1639, to govern themselves by the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut. This frame of government established a legislature and court system . By 1662 fifteen other towns founded in the Connecticut valley had adopted the Fundamental Orders, which were never confirmed by a royal charter. Congregationalism receive legal protection as the colony’s established church. meanwhile Connecticut organized itself to the colony of New Haven in 1643. After the Stuart dynasty resumed the English throne in 1660, Charles II gave Connecticut the right of self-government by a charter dated May 3 1662. the charter also gave the new government jurisdiction over New Haven’s towns. Which were then done away with. Connecticut briefly lost its rights to self-government when it was placed under the authority of the autocratic domain of New England in 1687, but it resumed ...

Friday, February 21, 2020

Health Literacy and Patient Empowerment Assignment

Health Literacy and Patient Empowerment - Assignment Example Is it low, medium, or high? Explain your rating system for the three literacy levels. What are the factors that contribute to the literacy level for individuals? The three article literacy range from medium to high. The first article by Estruch, et al. (2013) about the diet for those with the chronic disease can be rated as medium as it dwells on only one type of diet and which is limited to people. The second article by Nag & Ghosh (2013) is rated as high as it discusses the rate of this chronic disease in Asia and the risk factors associated with it. This is very important information for prevention. Lastly is the article by Jeemon (2011) which is rated highly as it also provides the socio-economic reasons associated with cause and prevention as well as management of the cardiovascular disease. People as a result of the statistics on the cardiovascular diseases are running towards technology and medical books to seek every piece of information whether it is on causes, prevention or even management. The articles are peer reviewed and hence people are reviewing them mostly and relying on the information being provided. The information they present are based on research and hence are reliable. The only change would be to add more about the diet on the first article by Estruch, et al. (2013). Patient empowerment means that a patient of the chronic disease has taken time to learn about the disease and not just rely on what is being fed to him or her by the medical team. They have expansive knowledge on the area and have consulted on the best treatment plan and management methods depending on the stage of the disease or level they are in (Hebda, Czar & Mascara, 2012). A patient that is empowered is highly literate when it comes to health literacy. He or she has a wide array of knowledge that can even be used to teach others such as relatives. When it comes to patient empowerment, some of the patients are initially